logisitik

Switch to desktop Register Login


Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/cpc38/public_html/components/com_k2/models/item.php on line 494

GreenSupplyChainAwardOur world is changing rapidly; the forces of nature are wreaking havoc, shifting environmental and turbulent weather patterns and ongoing calamitous and extreme conditions, which are all pointing towards “Sustainability” and “Embracing Green” as the only long-term solutions to help regulate the damage before it has severe consequences.

Today, companies and citizens, alike, are not only moving towards sustainable and eco-friendly products and solutions, but also ensuring and insisting for the “greening” of the entire end-to-end manufacturing, production, and logistics processes that are key to creating the end product.

Published in Best Practices

GreenSupplyChainAward

What do three leading chemical, automobile, and software companies have in common? All three – Honda, BASF and SAP– are looking to curb risks and take advantage of opportunities across their global supply chains. They’re doing so by measuring their greenhouse gas emissions not just in their operations but up and down their value chains.

Many other multinationals are heading in the same direction. The Carbon Disclosure Project’s (CDP) annual survey of the Global 500, released last month, reveals that seven in ten respondents measured some value chain emissions in 2011, up from about half in 2010. (Note this figure is based on WRI’s analysis of the 405 companies that submitted data to the CDP 2012 survey data.)

Published in Trends
Wednesday, 26 September 2012 07:44

Greening the supply chain

Green SCM T Rawling

Tracey Rawling Church, director of Brand & Reputation at KYOCERA Document Solutions UK Ltd, talks about greening the supply chain.

As organisations become more sophisticated in their approach to sustainability, their focus expands from direct product impacts during the use phase, to indirect impacts throughout the supply chain. For KYOCERA, this posed some challenges, due to the way our sales channel is structured. We can be confident about our direct product impacts, as our parent company has an established and robust method for product lifecycle analysis and sustainable manufacturing, as well as a mature sustainable procurement policy that covers the suppliers of raw material.

Published in Trends

VerdantixOnly four of the world’s largest food producers – Danone, Heinz, PepsiCo and Unilever – have invested in wide-ranging codes of conduct to guide their suppliers’ environmental performance, according to a new report from Verdantix.

Verdantix benchmarked the sustainable supply chain strategies of the 12 largest global food firms, with collective revenues of $390 billion, and found the other eight — Associated British Foods (ABF), ConAgra Foods, General Mills, Kellogg, Kraft, Mars, Nestlé and Sara Lee — need to invest in environmental supply chain policies to anticipate NGO scrutiny, better manage reputational risk, plan for resource scarcity and deal with competitive pressure.

Published in Corporate

Sustainable Supply Chain

In the business world, fiscal imperatives often prevail over values—even the values of social responsibility and ethical behavior—as corporations strive to mitigate costs and reduce uncertainty. Nowhere is that drive for certainty and cost containment more compelling than in the corporate supply chain.

The global marketplace demands that supply chains be nimble and diffuse. Their broad distribution has elevated their significance beyond the functionality of manufacturing and transport, and they are transformative in the way they remake a corporation and the effect they have on local economies. An efficient supply chain is responsive to changing priorities by keeping costs in line, schedules on time and, more importantly, giving companies the room to scale for growth.

Published in Trends

Green Supply Chain

Manufacturers have a lot of work to do to convince their supply chain partners to go green

Although manufacturers have stepped up their efforts aimed at reducing their own carbon footprints, they have yet to significantly widen those efforts throughout their supply chains.

According to a recent study conducted by the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) and Accenture, while 43% of the respondents say they have achieved year-on-year emissions reductions, only 28% of their suppliers can say the same. Part of the reason, explains Frances Way, program director for CDP, is that companies have had to train their procurement staffs in supply chain carbon management, which can be a significant investment.

While encouraged by the number of companies that say they've begun that training process, Way notes that "these trends are only now emerging, so we are yet to see a transformational impact on suppliers' emissions."

Published in Industry

Starbuck

In recent years, we've seen the explosion of supply chain management programs and eco-labels assuring buyers that products are sustainably produced. The Ecolabel Index currently tracks 424 different types of ecolabels in 246 countries and 25 industry sectors -- 145 related to food alone.

While many companies have also started developing their own supplier certification programs tailored to their specific needs and operating environment, few programs (even ecolabels) have devoted resources to ongoing monitoring of the programs.

With so much financial investment in these programs, many have begun to ask: Have the programs been effective? Are they driving sustainable production in the sector and providing some of the social benefits they promised? Recently, Conservation International (CI) collaborated with our longtime partner, Starbucks Coffee Company, to begin answering these questions for its home-grown supply chain program, Coffee and Farmer Equity (C.A.F.E.) Practices, and we have a few takeaways to share on the value of these assessments as well as how to build ongoing results assessment into your own program.

Published in Corporate

Green SCM

I was recently at the New York Stock Exchange for the Carbon Disclosure Project’s (CDP) Spring Workshop, where I moderated a panel discussion with representatives from Walmart, Microsoft and Coca-Cola on Smart Thinking in Delivering Significant Supply Chain Emissions Reductions. We had a lively discussion about how to drive greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions in the supply chain, and I left the event encouraged, but also aware of the challenges companies face when assessing emissions across their value chains.

Published in Best Practices

© 2009-2012 Logisitik - All Rights Reserved

Top Desktop version